Department News

It takes patience to restore watercourses

A common way to restore Swedish streams previously used for timber-floating has been to return rocks. A group of researchers at Umeå University has studied the effects of improved methods that also add large boulders and trees. Creating complex channels and watercourses is easy, but reintroducing pl...

Three research projects share SEK 94 million

The Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation has granted over SEK 94 million to three research projects in medicine and natural sciences at Umeå University. The projects are led by researchers Maria Fällman, Jan Karlsson and Markus Schmid. Also, several Umeå researchers are co-applicants to a large join...

When, where and how is ice formed in northern streams?

Ice formation is important in northern streams with long winters as it affects plants and animals in various ways. But knowledge on variations in ice formation processes has been inadequate. Former doctoral student, Lovisa Lind, at Umeå University, has created a model for ice formation that can be o...

Better models to forecast effects of environmental change on food webs

Extinctions, variations in population densities, and large algal blooms in waters are examples of expected effects of global warming and nutrient over-fertilization. Wojciech Uszko at Umeå University shows how simple mathematical models can help us understand mechanisms behind these phenomena and fo...

Forest and watercourse interplay important for restorations

Humans utilise forests and watercourses in a way that depletes ecosystem habitats, biodiversity and ecosystem services. Many areas are restored to break the trend, but to succeed you need to consider not only the ecosystem in mind, but also surrounding ecosystems. This according to researchers in Um...

Invasive waterflea can change ecosystems in the Bothnian Bay

The highly bioinvasive water flea, Cercopagis pengoi, has spread from the Caspian Sea to greater parts of the Baltic Sea. In the Bothnian Bay, it seems to meet a barrier in the area between the Bothnian Sea and the Bothnian Bay. Climate change can lead to the barrier of northward spreading is torn d...

Less fish in the future Baltic Sea

In the northern parts of the Baltic Sea both precipitation and river discharge are expected to increase as a result of climate changes. The increased river discharge will lead to a higher inflow of river-borne dissolved organic matter to the coastal zone, which in turn will promote bacterial product...

Ecosystems with many and similar species can handle tougher environmental disturbances

How sensitive an ecosystem is to unforeseen environmental stress can be determined, according to Daniel Bruno, previous visiting researcher at Umeå University. The approach is to study how many species there are in an ecosystem and what proportion of these can replace species that are hard hit by en...

Underestimated production on shallow bottoms

Microalgae growing on sea bottoms in shallow areas have a significant role in the marine ecosystem. A group of EcoChange researchers have studied their contribution to primary production in the northern part of the Baltic Sea, and have received results which show that earlier studies have underestim...

Do fish survive in streams in winter?

Most stream-resident fish stay throughout winter despite the ice. This has been shown by Christine Weber, previous researcher at Umeå University, by tagging trout and sculpins with transponders to follow fish migration. Fish’s general state of health is the single most important factor for surviving...

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